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(art by Odyism Odera Igbokwe)
Anyanwu
Alusi of the sun, her name in Igbo means eye of the sun. She is one of the important deities in the Igbo religion of Odinani. Anyanwu represents the perfect image of what people should aspire to be
Amongst Ndi Igbo, the Sun was referred to as Anyanwu (An-yan-wew). This is a combination of two different words. The first word, anya means eye. The second word, anwu, means light. Together, the phrase reads as “eye of light.”Anywanu played a very large role in life of the Umunri. “Nri people believed that the sun was the dwelling place of Anyanwu (The God of Light and Agbala (The Holy Spirit). They believed Agbala to be the collective spirit of all holy beings (human and nonhuman). The Holy Spirit was a perfect agent of Chi-Ukwu or Chineke (the Creator God). 

Anyanwu by Odyism

(art by Odyism Odera Igbokwe)

Anyanwu

Alusi of the sun, her name in Igbo means eye of the sun. She is one of the important deities in the Igbo religion of Odinani. Anyanwu represents the perfect image of what people should aspire to be

Amongst Ndi Igbo, the Sun was referred to as Anyanwu (An-yan-wew). This is a combination of two different words. The first word, anya means eye. The second word, anwu, means light. Together, the phrase reads as “eye of light.”

Anywanu played a very large role in life of the Umunri. “Nri people believed that the sun was the dwelling place of Anyanwu (The God of Light and Agbala (The Holy Spirit). They believed Agbala to be the collective spirit of all holy beings (human and nonhuman). The Holy Spirit was a perfect agent of Chi-Ukwu or Chineke (the Creator God). 

Video

thefemaletyrant:

emotanreincarnated:

2brwngrls:

Teaser Trailer For ‘Oya: Rise of the Orishas’ - Project Resurrecting Orishas As Modern Day Superheroes

Cool concept but Orishas are not superheroes, they are gods! . I don’t know how i feel about this.

I don’t think this project refutes the fact that Orishas are deities. I interviewed the people behind it last year and they seem to have more respect for the Orishas than most Nigerians I know.

Video

eastafricaart:

Based upon a Maasai folktale, ‘The Legend of Ngong Hills’ is the creation story of these magnificent hills that backdrop present day Nairobi, Kenya…

The humongous and frightful Ogre of the forest, who has a habit of attacking the Maasai village, falls in love with the beautiful young maiden…a story of greed, tyranny and courage.

Running time: 9 min 30 sec

Directed by Kwame Nyong’o
Original Score by Jim Pywell
Produced by Apes in Space © 2011

(Source: kwamenyongo.com, via thefemaletyrant)

Link

thefemaletyrant:

bankuei:

shifawn:

“We used to know we were stronger than the devil”- Amiri Baraka

We used to know we weren’t the devil either. I woke this morning with this quote from poet Amiri Baraka on my mind. The award winning poet, playwright, and visionary passed over into the realm of the ancestors Thursday January 9th. I remember seeing him (as much as a 4 year old can remember anything) at an interactive play he staged about the Underground Railroad. He was controversial and sometimes confrontational like Voodoo’s gatekeeper Papa Legba. Legba has received a lot of attention of late, because of his truly outrageous depiction on the popular television show American Horror Story: Coven. It’s ironic that the show took so many episodes to introduce this iconic character because in the religion of Voodoo, Papa Legba always comes first.

Not a Cocaine Snorting Devil

The portrayal of Papa Legba in this week’s episode of American Horror Story: Covenleft a bad taste in a lot of people’s mouths, or should I say, up their noses. May I state now unequivocally as both an anthropologist and a Voodoo priestess that there is no association between Legba and drugs that I have ever come across in my over twenty years of practice and study. This week’s episode, in addition to having this ancient honored deity disrespectfully portrayed as a drug sniffing control freak, also shows him as a baby stealing, soul sucking devil. I wrote a few weeks ago that I predicted bad things for the introduction of this character, but this is beyond everyone’s lowest expectations.  The buzz I have been seeing online is that people are done, that this is beyond offensive. It’s also just plain wrong. The show, in addition to falsely equating Legba with the Devil, seems to have collapsed his character with that of the Voodoo Lwa Baron Samedi, traditionally depicted with a Top Hat and images of the dead, as he is the ruler of the cemetery. The reality is that Legba is the wise teacher, the communicator between the worlds. I like to call him the gentle guiding paternal influence we all wish we had.

Haiti’s Gatekeeper

Legba by Bart Eversonlicensed under CC 2.0

In Haitian Vodou the Lwa Legba is the gatekeeper: he is petitioned to open the way to the other realms. Leah Gordon’s beautiful work The Book of Vodou talks in detail about this keeper of the crossroads. He is the “powerful spirit of communication between all spheres of life and death. The cross is his symbol, because it is at the apex of this cross that heaven and earth intersect.”

Crescent City’s Papa Lebas

In my book Voodoo and Afro-Caribbean Paganism, I talk about the unique manifestation of Legba in New Orleans. Papa Lebas or Lebat receives his name from the missionary Father Jean Baptiste Lebat. In the late Seventeenth and early Eighteenth century Lebat was responsible for trying to eradicate Voodoo from the area. In typical Voodoo fashion he is given the responsibility for the opposite function he performed in the physical world.” People would pray before the start of their services to Papa Lebat to allow the ritual to take place without intervention of the authorities. This fusion or Louisiana Gumbo of traditions is a common practice in the area.

Sacred Attributes

Colors: Red and Black

Sacred Place: Crossroads, Doorways

Ritual Numbers: 3 or sometimes 21 (which is similar to Eleggua in Santeria/Lucumi)

Offerings: Coffee, Rum, Cigars, Keys, Cane

Images: Crossroads veve, Catholic images of St. Anthony, St. Peter

You can hear a truly moving version of the Legba Chant by Boukman Eksperyanshere.

Trying to learn more about this. Anyone want to help find more articles?

Elegba is the divine messenger - the one who carries the prayers or messages between everyone - he speaks all languages and can travel anywhere.  He also happens to carry out all the duties of handling “luck”, “chance” or circumstance - so you can avoid some situations or find yourself in them.

The ability to control delivering messages, or misunderstandings, the ability to arrange things to happen for better… or worse, is a very powerful position.   It is this role as the one who tests people by giving them a chance to play themselves out, that some choose to interpret as “the Devil”.

Elegba’s way of understanding is direct experience.  As the one who can go everywhere, be anything, he is about experiencing things to learn (in contrast to say, Obatala, who deduces/comprehends them with deep thought).  Which is why the imagery of Elegba is all contradictions - a child, an old man, candy and toys (childhood, innocence), liquor, cigars and sex (adulthood, adult pleasures) - to “speak all languages”, he has experienced all things from every viewpoint.

It is also why when you hear the stories about Elegba, it is about personally experiencing things - making mistakes, learning to do better.  Sometimes he is warning another person (who usually doesn’t listen and has to learn the hard way) sometimes he plays the fool in order to show everyone what the results will be.   Sometimes he sets up situations where people can see how limited, subjective or biased their thinking was.

Elegba’s trickery is often a demonstration about how much folks are trapped by greed, ego, and social conditioning - not about any form of rebellion.  The “chaos” is simply that the cause and effect chain Elegba operates in is too big for most people to see - it appears like “chaos” because they can’t understand it.

Elegba stands at every threshold, every gate, every crossroads - Elegba stands at the point of potential transformation.  As much as new experiences teach you new things, it also makes you into a new person.  Elegba stands at the door to see what kind of person you are stepping in, and what kind of person you make yourself into when you step across.

Elegba also delivers you to what is at the end of that road when you walk it.

The mindset of people who assume that responsibility for your own actions is “evil” says a lot about those folks right there.

All of this!

(Source: hoodoo-seed)

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Ok. What is a list of books about Voodoo, Vodun, fiction and nonfiction written by black people?

afrodiaspores:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

waterfrommymind:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

heartlandfemme:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

Zora Neale Hurston wrote Tell My Horse: Voodoo and Life in Haiti and Jamaica Jewell Parker Rhodes wrote Voodoo Dreams a novel of Marie Laveau. Who else?

My love, My Love by Rosa Guy, Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson, Yvonne Chireau’s Black Magic, Katrina Hazzard-Donald’s “Mojo Workin” are some really good ones.

Thank you! 

The Faces of the Gods by Leslie G. Desmangles, a book recommended to me by a Vodou priestess

Thnak you!

Broadly interpreting, to bring in other Afro-Diasporic religions:

Patrick Bellegarde-Smith and Claudine Michel, _Haitian Vodou: Spirit, Myth, and Reality_

Kamari Maxine Clarke, _Mapping Yorùbá Networks: Power and Agency in the Making of Transnational Communities_

Yvonne Daniel, _Dancing WisdomEmbodied Knowledge in Haitian VodouCuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomblé_

Katherine Dunham, _Island Possessed_

Rachel E Harding, _A Refuge in ThunderCandomblé and Alternative Spaces of Blackness_

Tracey E. Hucks, _Yoruba Traditions and African American Religious Nationalism_

J. Lorand Matory, _Black Atlantic Religion: Tradition, Transnationalism and Matriarchy in the Afro-Brazilian Candomblé_

Luisah Teish, _Jambalaya: The Natural Woman’s Book of Personal Charms and Practical Rituals_

Mikelle Smith Omari-Tunkara, _Manipulating the Sacred: Yorùbá Art, Ritual, and Resistance in Brazilian Candomblé_

Marta Moreno Vega, _The Altar of My Soul: The Living Traditions of Santeria_

Jason R. Young, _Rituals of ResistanceAfrican Atlantic Religion in Kongo and the Lowcountry South in the Era of Slavery_

(via thefemaletyrant)

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afrodiaspores:

Images of the Yorùbá deity Elegguá, as envisioned by Afro-Cuban Lucumí initiates, by Josefa Tarafa, for Lydia Cabrera’s El monte. Igbo-finda, ewe orisha, vititi nfinda (notas sobre las religiones, la magia, las supersticiones y el folklore de los negros criollos y del pueblo de Cuba), 1954

afrodiaspores:

Images of the Yorùbá deity Elegguá, as envisioned by Afro-Cuban Lucumí initiates, by Josefa Tarafa, for Lydia Cabrera’s El monte. Igbo-finda, ewe orisha, vititi nfinda (notas sobre las religiones, la magia, las supersticiones y el folklore de los negros criollos y del pueblo de Cuba), 1954

(via thefemaletyrant)

Photoset

sourcedumal:

cinekenya:

Oya: Rise of the Orishas, takes a pantheon of ancient West African deities, known as Orisha, and resurrects them as modern day superheroes in a new action packed film.

We focus on a young woman named Adesuwa who has the unique ability to transform into the fearsome warrior goddess, Oya, the Orisha of change. When she does, she gains amazing powers.

The filmmakers need funding to get it made. Go to their indiegogo page to find out more.

DONATE TO THIS

DONATE TO IT RIGHT NOW

(Source: cinemakenya)

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odofemi:

Yemaya Okute by Maria Alemanno
Yemaya Okute (or Yemoja Ogunte) is a young, warrior Yemaya. She is the wife of Ogun and lives half the year in the ocean and half the year in the woods. The machete is her tool.

odofemi:

Yemaya Okute by Maria Alemanno

Yemaya Okute (or Yemoja Ogunte) is a young, warrior Yemaya. She is the wife of Ogun and lives half the year in the ocean and half the year in the woods. The machete is her tool.

(via thefemaletyrant)

Photoset

fyahblaze:

Erzulie Fréda Dahomey, the Rada aspect of Erzulie, is the spirit of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, luxury, and flowers. She wears three wedding rings, one for each husband -DamballaAgwe and Ogoun. Her symbol is a heart, her colours are pink, blue, white and gold, and her favourite sacrifices include jewellery, perfume, sweet cakes and liqueurs. Coquettish and very fond of beauty and finery, Erzulie Freda is femininity and compassion embodied, yet she also has a darker side; she is seen as jealous and spoiled and within some vodoun circles is considered to be lazy. When she mounts a serviteur she flirts with all the men, and treats all the women as rivals.

In Christian iconography she is often identified with the Mater Dolorosa. She is conceived of as never able to attain her heart’s most fervent desire. For this reason she always leaves a service in tears. Her syncretic iconographical depiction is usually based on that of the Virgin and Child, because she is the mother of Ti. Common syncretizations include Our Lady of Lourdes because she is usually depicted as light-skinned.

In her Petro nation aspect as Erzulie Dantor she is often depicted as a scarred and buxom black woman, holding a child protectively in her arms. She is a particularly fierce protector of women and children. She is often identified with lesbian women.

A common syncretic depiction of Erzulie Dantor is St. Jeanne D’Arc, who is displayed carrying or supporting a sword. Another is as theBlack Madonna of Częstochowa, as she is represented as being dark-skinned. Her colours are red, gold and navy blue. Her symbols are a pierced heart and knives or swords. Her favourite sacrifices include black pigs, griot (seasoned fried pork), and rum.

The scars on her cheek are said to be the result of a fight between her and Erzulie Freda over possession of Ti-Jean Petro, as the two are fierce rivals. The cuts shown on her face in the syncretic reproductions are matches to the surface damage on the Black Madonna’s face in the original icon.

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Rada

  • Erzulie Freda (Lady Erzulie) - The vain and flirty goddess of love. Her “horses” tend to cry tears of longing and regret. She is syncretized with Our Lady of Sorrows (the Virgin Mary as suffering mother).
  • Erzulie Balianne (Erzulie the Gagged) - “Silences” (heals or calms) hearts. Keeps secrets or ensures that secrets will not be revealed. Helps people to forget past loves and overcome passionate emotions. Her “horses” tend to speak as if they have a gag in their mouth. She is syncretized with The Immaculate Heart.
  • Erzulie Mansur (Erzulie the Blessed) - Represents maternal love and protects children from harm.
  • Granne Erzulie (Grandma Erzulie) - Represents the wisdom granted by experience and maturity and grandmotherly kindness and love. She is syncretized with St. Anne, the mother of the Virgin Mary.

Petro

  • Erzulie D’en Tort or Erzulie Dantor (Erzulie of the Wrongs) Protects women and children and deals revenge against those who wrong them.
  • Erzulie Mapiangue (Erzulie the Suckler) Deals with the pain of childbirth and the protection of unborn and newborn babies. Her “horses” tend to get in a fetal position or birthing position and cry tears of pain. Common syncretization is as the Virgin and Infant of Prague, which wear matching red velvet robes and gold crowns.
  • Erzulie Yeux Rouge or Erzulie Ge-Rouge (Red-Eyed Erzulie) Takes revenge on unfaithful lovers. Her “horses” cry tears of bitter sadness.
  • Erzulie Toho Aids the jealous or slighted in love. Her “horses” cry tears of anger.

Others

  • Erzulie La Flambeau(Erzulie of the Torch)
  • Erzulie Wangol(Erzulie of theSacred Banner)

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  • La Sirène or Mami Wata is partly associated with Erzulie and sometimes is displayed in Erzulie’s roles as mother, lover, and protector. Her husband is Agwe, the King of the Sea and patron of sailors and fishermen.
  • Marinette Bras-Chêche or Marinette Bwa Chech (“Marinette of the Dry Arms”), a Kongo Loa, is similar to Erzulie Dantor. She represents revolt and misfortune and is prayed to either placate her wrath or direct her fury at another.
  • Mai-Louise is an Ibo goddess.
  • Ti-Quitta
  • Ochun or Oshun, a Yoruban river goddess, is similar to Erzulie Freda.
  • Maman Brigitte (“Mother Brigitte”), is a Guede goddess who is the wife of Baron Samedi. She is syncretically represented by St. Brigit.

(via thefemaletyrant)

Video

"Ọya: Something Happened on the Way to West Africa!" -excerpt

this documentary is a work in progress. the is a personal and political story which addresses the effects of memory on a current Òrìṣà cosmology while exploring  womyn’s leadership within indigenous Yorùbá spirituality.

visual language/treatment of film.
this documentary is non-linear in nature. it is utilizing ritual and performance against text/audio.  there is a layering of images and audio which  resonates with the multiple truths/levels of the practice/culture. 

check out and support this documentary by filmmaker seyi adebanjo

thank you

submitted by naijaboi