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Meji Book One & Two by Milton J Davis

Book suggestion from another Anon (seriously man tell me who you are to give you credit)

On the continent of Uhuru, in the grasslands of the Sesu, Inkosi Dingane is granted his wish. His Great Wife Shani bears him a son, an heir to his growing empire. But the ancestors have plans of their own. Shani bears him twin boys, meji, an abomination among the Sesu, but a blessing to Shani’s people, the Mawena.


Thus begins the story of two brothers destined to transform their world. One brother, Ndoro, fights for his place among the Sesu, hoping to shed the stigma of abomination. The other, Obaseki, grows to a man among the people of his mother, struggling with a gift that alienates him from his family and eventually leads to his exile. Both brothers set out to find his destiny, traveling through teeming savannah, mysterious forests, haunted ocean cliffs and infernal deserts, fulfilling a prophecy that would change them and their world forever.

Ndoro and Obaseki, twin brothers of royal birth, now find themselves on different paths towards the same destiny. Ndoro, driven by revenge, forges his adopted people, the Diaka, into the greatest weapon Uhuru has ever known. Obaseki begins a sojourn that takes him to the land of his mysterious spirit horn. Moyo, the pieces of his puzzling power falling into place with each step. As each brothers’ power grows their paths become clear. Meji Book Two continues where Meji Book One ends, following the brothers through adulthood. Each amazing adventure reveals more of the wonderful world that is Uhuru. In Meji Book Two, Two will become One.

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African epic fantasy

If you ever have time, will you check out a book entitled, “The Deadly Quest for Faith?” It’s an epic fantasy novel about a black girl’s quest to destroy evil. It is a series (The Girl of Good and Evil) that will cover african mythology and can be found as an ebook on both amazon and barnes and noble websites. Thank you for your time.

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King Sango was acquainted with many deadly charms and he once happened to discover a preparation by which he could attract lightning.

He foolishly decided to try the effect of the charm first of all on his own palace, which was at the foot of a hill.

Ascending the hill with his courtiers, the King employed the charm: a storm suddenly rose, the palace was struck by lightning and burnt to the ground, together with Sango’s whole family.

Overcome with grief at having lost his possessions, and above all his sons, the impetuous King resolved to retire to a corner of his kingdom and rule no more. Some of his courtiers agreed with him, and others tried to dissuade him from the plan; but Sango in his rage executed a hundred and sixty of them —eighty who had disagreed with him, and eighty who had agree too eagerly!

Then, accompanied by a few friends, he left the palace and started on his long journey. One by one his friends deserted him on the way, until he was left alone, and in despair he decided to put an end to his life, which he rashly did.

When they heard of the deed, his people came to the spot and gave him an honourable funeral, and he was ever afterwards worshipped as the god of thunder and lightning.

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excentricyoruba:

The Water Bird

A water-bird once, in search of food, swallowed the King of the crabs, and the whole tribe of crabs were so enraged that they swore they would have their revenge.

‘We will find this horrible bird,’ they declared, ‘and nip off its legs. We shall not fail to find it, for its legs are bright pink in colour and its feathers are pink and white.’

But the water-rat overheard the crabs plotting and hastened to tell the water-bird.

‘Oh! Oh!’ cried the water-bird. ‘They will nip off my beautiful pink legs, and then waht will become of me? Whatever can I do?’

‘It is very simple,’ replied the water-rat. ‘If you stand on one leg, they will think you are some other creature.’

The bird thanked him and tucked up one leg. When the crabs came, they saw, as they thought, a very tall pink bird with one leg and a large beak.

‘Our enemy has two legs,’ they said. ‘This cannot be he.’ And they passed away.

Ahahahaha!

(Source: thefemaletyrant)

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Anonymous said: hausa version of the story

???

Can you be more specific please

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Mawu also known as Mahu is the Loa (goddess) in Dahomean (Fon) religion of the sun, moon and creation. She is the twin sister of the God Lisa and and also his wife in some variations. In other variation, both deities are of both genders and androgynous in appearance and is known as the deity, Mawu-Lisa. Mahu and Lisa are the children of Nana Buluku and are the parents of Xevioso

After creating the earth and all life and everything else on it, she became concerned that it might be too heavy, so she asked the primeval serpent, Aido Hwedo, to curl up beneath the earth and thrust it up in the sky. When she asked Awe, a monkey she had also created, to help out and make some more animals out of clay, he boasted to the other animals and challenged Mawu. Gbadu, the first woman Mawu had created, saw all the chaos on earth and told her children to go out among the people and remind them that only Mawu can give Sekpoli - the breath of life. Gbadu instructed her daughter, Minona, to go out among the people and teach them about the use of palm kernels as omens from Mawu. When Awe, the arrogant monkey climbed up to the heavens to try to show Mawu that he too could give life, he failed miserably. Mawu made him a bowl of porridge with the seed of death in it and reminded him that only she could give life and that she could also take it away.

Mawu also known as Mahu is the Loa (goddess) in Dahomean (Fon) religion of the sun, moon and creation. She is the twin sister of the God Lisa and and also his wife in some variations. In other variation, both deities are of both genders and androgynous in appearance and is known as the deity, Mawu-Lisa. Mahu and Lisa are the children of Nana Buluku and are the parents of Xevioso

After creating the earth and all life and everything else on it, she became concerned that it might be too heavy, so she asked the primeval serpent, Aido Hwedo, to curl up beneath the earth and thrust it up in the sky. When she asked Awe, a monkey she had also created, to help out and make some more animals out of clay, he boasted to the other animals and challenged Mawu. Gbadu, the first woman Mawu had created, saw all the chaos on earth and told her children to go out among the people and remind them that only Mawu can give Sekpoli - the breath of life. Gbadu instructed her daughter, Minona, to go out among the people and teach them about the use of palm kernels as omens from Mawu. When Awe, the arrogant monkey climbed up to the heavens to try to show Mawu that he too could give life, he failed miserably. Mawu made him a bowl of porridge with the seed of death in it and reminded him that only she could give life and that she could also take it away.

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Ayida-Weddo

(Art by Thalia Took)

Ayida-Weddo, also known as Aida Wedo or Aido Quedo or Rainbow Serpent is the Vodou goddess of sweet waters, serpents, fertility and rainbows. She is represented  by the rainbow python.

Ayida-Weddo is a benevolent and sweet goddess, she is worshiped in parts of the Caribbean and in Benin. She represents continuity, strength, integration and wholeness.

Ayida-Weddo rules over fire, water, wind and the rainbow. She is also associated with wisdom. She protects creation.

Ayida-Weddo is the wife, or feminine aspect of Damballa-Wedo, the Sky God. Together, they both represent the principles of birth and creation.

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Dhegdheer

Dhegdheer

Cannibal woman

Somalia

Deadly

Dhegdheer, also known as Lady Dhegdheer is a very famous character in Somali oral history. Her name, Dhegdheer means ‘the one with the long ear’. She had long ears that enhance her hearing enabling her to hear sounds from far away. When Dhegdheer sleeps, she folds her long ears.

Dhegdheer is known to eat children who move about at night.

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Bayajida

Bayajida is the legendary hero of Hausa tradition said to be the son of the king of Baghdad. According to tradition, Bayajida left Baghdad and wandered about till he reached the Kanem-Bornu empire, in Northern Nigeria. In Kanem-Bornu, he found favour with the ruling king and married the king’s daughter, Magira. However as Bayajida’s fame, power and wealth grew his father-in-law became jealous and decided to kill him. Upon learning of this, Bayajida and Magira fled Kanem-Bornu and settled in Hadeija where he left Magira and continued travelling. Bayajida then reached another town where talented blacksmiths forged a sword for him.

With his newly forged sword, Bayajida travelled to the town of Daura which was ruled by a Queen called Daurama. There, an elderly woman agreed to let him stay in her house however when Bayajida requested a drink of water, the woman told him that there was none. She explained that the town had just one well, in which a great snake called Sarki lived. The snake was evil and only let villagers take water from the well on certain days.

Bayajida decided to confront the snake so he went to the well, and managed to kill the snake with his sword.  Bayajida cut off the snake’s head and left its body by the well. He then drew some water from the well and returned to the elderly woman’s house with the snake’s head in his sack.

News spread quickly of the snake’s death, when it Queen Daurama she declared that she would give half her land to whoever killed the snake. Several people came forth claiming that they had killed the snake, but no one was able to produce its head. Finally, the woman had hosted Bayajida came forward and told Queen Daurama about her unusual guest. The Queen summoned Bayajida, in the Queen’s presence he revealed that he was the person behind the snake’s death by showing her the snake’s head.

When Queen Daurama offered Bayajida half her land, he refused and instead asked the Queen to marry him. She accepted, and they lived a long, happy life together. Their son, Bawo, ruled Daura after their death while Bawo’s six sons became the founders and rulers of six of the seven Hausa states. The son of Bayajida by his first wife, Magira, founded and ruled the seventh Hausa state.

The well that the snake is said to have resided still stands today in Daura.

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(Art by Victor P Corbella)
Eloko (plural: Bikolo)
Origins-Mongo tribe (Congo) Zaire
Habitat- Rainforest
Dwarf/trolls
Eloko (pl, Biloko) is a term in a Mongo-Nkundo language referring to a kind of dwarf-like creature that lives in the forests. They are believed to be the spirits of ancestors of the people living there. Legend has it that they haunt the forest because they have some grudge to settle with the living and are generally quite vicious. Biloko live in the densest and darkest part of the rain forest in central Zaire, jealously and ferociously guarding their treasures: the game and the rare fruits of the forest. Only intrepid hunters are said to enter the deepest forest and survive, because in order to be successful, hunters have to possess strong magic, without which they would never see any game at all. There are many tales about wives who insist upon joining their husbands in the forest only to faint as soon as they see their first Eloko. The Biloko live in hollow trees and are dressed only in leaves. They have no hair; only grass grows on their bodies; they have piercing eyes, snouts with mouths that can be opened wide enough to admit a human body, alive or dead, and long, sharp claws of which they rub their large potbellies to cast their evil magic. They possess little bells, which, in Central Africa are believed to be able to cast a spell on passers-by. Possessing an amulet, talisman or some type of charm can offer protection from this type of magic.
A typical Eloko tale:

One day a hunter took his wife, at her insistence, into the forest, where he had a hut with a palisade around it. When he went out to inspect his traps, he told her: “When you hear a bell, do not move. If you do, you will die!” Soon after he had left, she heard the charming sound of a little bell coming closer, for the Eloko has a good nose for feminine flesh. Finally, a gentle voice asked to be let in to his room. It was like the voice of a child. The woman opened the door and there was an Eloko, smelling like the forest, looking small and innocent. She offered him banana mash with fried fish but he refused: “We eat only human meat. I have not eaten for a long time. Give me a piece of your arm.” At last the woman consented, totally under the spell of the Eloko. That night, the husband found her bones.

(Art by Victor P Corbella)

Eloko (plural: Bikolo)

Origins-Mongo tribe (Congo) Zaire

Habitat- Rainforest

Dwarf/trolls

Eloko (pl, Biloko) is a term in a Mongo-Nkundo language referring to a kind of dwarf-like creature that lives in the forests. They are believed to be the spirits of ancestors of the people living there. Legend has it that they haunt the forest because they have some grudge to settle with the living and are generally quite vicious. Biloko live in the densest and darkest part of the rain forest in central Zaire, jealously and ferociously guarding their treasures: the game and the rare fruits of the forest. Only intrepid hunters are said to enter the deepest forest and survive, because in order to be successful, hunters have to possess strong magic, without which they would never see any game at all. There are many tales about wives who insist upon joining their husbands in the forest only to faint as soon as they see their first Eloko. The Biloko live in hollow trees and are dressed only in leaves. They have no hair; only grass grows on their bodies; they have piercing eyes, snouts with mouths that can be opened wide enough to admit a human body, alive or dead, and long, sharp claws of which they rub their large potbellies to cast their evil magic. They possess little bells, which, in Central Africa are believed to be able to cast a spell on passers-by. Possessing an amulet, talisman or some type of charm can offer protection from this type of magic.

A typical Eloko tale:

One day a hunter took his wife, at her insistence, into the forest, where he had a hut with a palisade around it. When he went out to inspect his traps, he told her: “When you hear a bell, do not move. If you do, you will die!” Soon after he had left, she heard the charming sound of a little bell coming closer, for the Eloko has a good nose for feminine flesh. Finally, a gentle voice asked to be let in to his room. It was like the voice of a child. The woman opened the door and there was an Eloko, smelling like the forest, looking small and innocent. She offered him banana mash with fried fish but he refused: “We eat only human meat. I have not eaten for a long time. Give me a piece of your arm.” At last the woman consented, totally under the spell of the Eloko. That night, the husband found her bones.