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Aja An Orisha and patron of the forest, the animals and herbal healers of whome she taught their art.
Aja is referred to as “wild wind” in Yoruba. It is said that if someone is carried away by Aja and returns they are believed to have become a powerful “jujuman” or babalawo. The journey supposedly will have a duratation of between 7 days to 3 months, and the person carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven.

Aja An Orisha and patron of the forest, the animals and herbal healers of whome she taught their art.

Aja is referred to as “wild wind” in Yoruba. It is said that if someone is carried away by Aja and returns they are believed to have become a powerful “jujuman” or babalawo. The journey supposedly will have a duratation of between 7 days to 3 months, and the person carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven.

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Yewa (also known as Ewa)
The orisha associated with death and the final resting place of the underworld and watches over and protects people’s graves and is the guide the dead to the afterlife. As guardian of the underworld she aslo works alongside Oya. Yewa’s colours are burgundy and pink, she often depicted eliding a horsetail whip and a sword.

Yewa (also known as Ewa)

The orisha associated with death and the final resting place of the underworld and watches over and protects people’s graves and is the guide the dead to the afterlife. As guardian of the underworld she aslo works alongside Oya. Yewa’s colours are burgundy and pink, she often depicted eliding a horsetail whip and a sword.

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Shango (also known as Chango, Sango, or Xango) 
King of the orisha pantheon, rules over thunder, fire, drumming, dancing and male virility. Shango is actually a deified king who was once the Fourth Alafin of the city-state of Oyó. He is one of the most worshipped orishas in the pantheon and his legends are numerous and speak to the human experience. He has four separate wives: Obba - his first wife who was faithful but unattractive so Shango withdrew his affections from her, Oshun his favourite lover, Oya his equal in strength and power, and Yewa the virgin daughter of Obatala whose purity was stolen by Shango. He is the the owner of the sacred drums, a powerful sorcerer who wields fire and lightning, and loves to seduce women, drink and dance. Shango has a special relationship with Babalu Aye as he was the only orisha to offer him assistance when he was sick and homeless. Shango is often considered the son of Yemaya and his fatherhood is either credited to Ogun or Aggayu. Shango was a very impulsive youth and was quick to anger, and legend has it that Obatala taught Shango the art of diplomacy and gifted him with the white bead that is now a part of his necklace. In nature, Shango is said to live at the top of the royal palm tree and his offerings are commonly placed at the foot of palm trees. Shango is petitioned for help with protection, enemies, sexual, business success, and good fortune.

Shango (also known as Chango, Sango, or Xango)

King of the orisha pantheon, rules over thunder, fire, drumming, dancing and male virility. Shango is actually a deified king who was once the Fourth Alafin of the city-state of Oyó. He is one of the most worshipped orishas in the pantheon and his legends are numerous and speak to the human experience. He has four separate wives: Obba - his first wife who was faithful but unattractive so Shango withdrew his affections from her, Oshun his favourite lover, Oya his equal in strength and power, and Yewa the virgin daughter of Obatala whose purity was stolen by Shango. He is the the owner of the sacred drums, a powerful sorcerer who wields fire and lightning, and loves to seduce women, drink and dance. Shango has a special relationship with Babalu Aye as he was the only orisha to offer him assistance when he was sick and homeless. Shango is often considered the son of Yemaya and his fatherhood is either credited to Ogun or Aggayu. Shango was a very impulsive youth and was quick to anger, and legend has it that Obatala taught Shango the art of diplomacy and gifted him with the white bead that is now a part of his necklace. In nature, Shango is said to live at the top of the royal palm tree and his offerings are commonly placed at the foot of palm trees. Shango is petitioned for help with protection, enemies, sexual, business success, and good fortune.

Shangó

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Orunmila (also known as Orula, Orunla, or Ifa) 
The orisha of divination. He is the “eleripin” — the witness of destiny — who knows everything that awaits us as part of our fate. He has a very close working relationship with Eleggua and together they intercede on behalf of humanity to alter people’s destinies, ward off death and other misfortunes, and guide us to cultivate good character. His worship is primarily centred around the Ifá tradition, both in traditional African worship and in the African Diaspora in the new world, where his initiated priests, called awos, babalawos, iyanifas or oluwos, act as diviners for the greater community. He is petitioned for help with making wise descisons, opening roads, healing and protection from evil.

Orunmila (also known as Orula, Orunla, or Ifa)

The orisha of divination. He is the “eleripin” — the witness of destiny — who knows everything that awaits us as part of our fate. He has a very close working relationship with Eleggua and together they intercede on behalf of humanity to alter people’s destinies, ward off death and other misfortunes, and guide us to cultivate good character. His worship is primarily centred around the Ifá tradition, both in traditional African worship and in the African Diaspora in the new world, where his initiated priests, called awos, babalawos, iyanifas or oluwos, act as diviners for the greater community. He is petitioned for help with making wise descisons, opening roads, healing and protection from evil.


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Osain (also known as Ozain or Osanyin)

Orisha of wild plants, healing and magic. He is a powerful wizard, master of all spell craft and is found out in the wild, untamed areas of nature. Without Osain, none of the ceremonies in the religion can happen; it is his magic that is used to conjure the shrines of the orishas. Osain is commonly understood to be Shango’s godfather who taught him how to spit fire and throw lightning. Osain’s magic is so powerful that no one can unravel his spells. Consequently he is petitioned for any purpose where unconquerable magic is required.
Osain is often depicted as an extremely disfigured, impish man. He has one eye, one hand, one foot, one tiny ear that can hear even a pin drop, and one ear larger than his head that hears nothing. He keeps all of his magic in a calabash that he hangs high in a tree, out of reach.

 

Osain (also known as Ozain or Osanyin)

Orisha of wild plants, healing and magic. He is a powerful wizard, master of all spell craft and is found out in the wild, untamed areas of nature. Without Osain, none of the ceremonies in the religion can happen; it is his magic that is used to conjure the shrines of the orishas. Osain is commonly understood to be Shango’s godfather who taught him how to spit fire and throw lightning. Osain’s magic is so powerful that no one can unravel his spells. Consequently he is petitioned for any purpose where unconquerable magic is required.

Osain is often depicted as an extremely disfigured, impish man. He has one eye, one hand, one foot, one tiny ear that can hear even a pin drop, and one ear larger than his head that hears nothing. He keeps all of his magic in a calabash that he hangs high in a tree, out of reach.

 

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Yemoja (also known as Yemaya and Iemanja) 
The queen of the Earth, owner of all waters, and the orish of motherhood. She is the mother of all living things and lives in the sea. Her name is a contraction of the Yoruba saying “iyá omó eyá” meaning “mother whose children are the fish.” and mer-people are Yemoja sacred offspring. She is the older sister of Oshun.
Yemoja wears seven panels skirts to represent the seven seas of which she rules over. She carries a black haired horse tail fly-whisk, a sabre, or a machete with which she defends her children. When she spins, the rippling edges of her dress are the tempestuous waves of the stormy sea.

Yemoja (also known as Yemaya and Iemanja)

The queen of the Earth, owner of all waters, and the orish of motherhood. She is the mother of all living things and lives in the sea. Her name is a contraction of the Yoruba saying “iyá omó eyá” meaning “mother whose children are the fish.” and mer-people are Yemoja sacred offspring. She is the older sister of Oshun.

Yemoja wears seven panels skirts to represent the seven seas of which she rules over. She carries a black haired horse tail fly-whisk, a sabre, or a machete with which she defends her children. When she spins, the rippling edges of her dress are the tempestuous waves of the stormy sea.


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Oshun (Ohun, or Ochun) 
The Orisha of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy and sweet fresh waters of rivers.  Ọṣhun is beneficent, generous and very kind. She does, however, have a horrific temper, one which she seldom ever loses but which causes untold destruction whenever she does
She is often depicted as a mermaid that resides in the river Oshun in modern Nigeria in the Osun state. During her yearly festival she is said to choose one or more young women to represent her in the dance of the sister of the waters.

Oshun (Ohun, or Ochun)

The Orisha of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy and sweet fresh waters of rivers.  Ọṣhun is beneficent, generous and very kind. She does, however, have a horrific temper, one which she seldom ever loses but which causes untold destruction whenever she does

She is often depicted as a mermaid that resides in the river Oshun in modern Nigeria in the Osun state. During her yearly festival she is said to choose one or more young women to represent her in the dance of the sister of the waters.

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Oya (also known as Yansa or Yansan)
a powerful female warrior orisha, one of Shango’s wives, owner of the marketplace, and owner of the cemetery and the ruler of winds. She, along with Orunmila, are the only two orishas who defeated Ikú, the force of death. She stole Shango’s secret of fire and now throws lightning bolts just like him. She raises the dead and commands them as her armies. She carries a machete and screams as she rides into battle on the tornado.

Oya (also known as Yansa or Yansan)

a powerful female warrior orisha, one of Shango’s wives, owner of the marketplace, and owner of the cemetery and the ruler of winds. She, along with Orunmila, are the only two orishas who defeated Ikú, the force of death. She stole Shango’s secret of fire and now throws lightning bolts just like him. She raises the dead and commands them as her armies. She carries a machete and screams as she rides into battle on the tornado.

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Ogun (also known Oggun, Ogum, or Ogou) 
A warrior orisha, along with Eleggua and Ochosi. He is a talented blacksmith, a crafter of tools, and the father of technology. He is the cutting edge of the knife that can be used either to heal or hurt. Without Ogun, neither the orishas nor humanity could eat nor would we all cease to exist. He is a fierce soldier who is known for his fiery temper and his unending loyalty. He is, in many ways, the executor of Olodumare’s justice on the earth. In fact, it is still Yoruban custom to swear an oath upon a piece of iron when testifying, instead of a holy book, as Ogun’s retribution for breaking that oath is something truly to be feared. He is petitioned for help with seeking employment, defense against enemies, or for protection.

Ogun (also known Oggun, Ogum, or Ogou)

A warrior orisha, along with Eleggua and Ochosi. He is a talented blacksmith, a crafter of tools, and the father of technology. He is the cutting edge of the knife that can be used either to heal or hurt. Without Ogun, neither the orishas nor humanity could eat nor would we all cease to exist. He is a fierce soldier who is known for his fiery temper and his unending loyalty. He is, in many ways, the executor of Olodumare’s justice on the earth. In fact, it is still Yoruban custom to swear an oath upon a piece of iron when testifying, instead of a holy book, as Ogun’s retribution for breaking that oath is something truly to be feared. He is petitioned for help with seeking employment, defense against enemies, or for protection.

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Eleggua (also known as Elegba, Legba, Elewa, or Eshu)
Is the most important of the Yoruba Orisha pantheon. He is the owener of the crossroads and his spirits is behind every door and a pathway. Without Eleggua the universal power cannot flow in this world that is why is his always propitiated first in every ceremony. He is also a trickster God, constanly challenging humanity’s intergity at every turn, his very complex yet simple.
Elegga is often depicted as a young man or boy with a cane and a mischievous smirk

Eleggua (also known as Elegba, Legba, Elewa, or Eshu)

Is the most important of the Yoruba Orisha pantheon. He is the owener of the crossroads and his spirits is behind every door and a pathway. Without Eleggua the universal power cannot flow in this world that is why is his always propitiated first in every ceremony. He is also a trickster God, constanly challenging humanity’s intergity at every turn, his very complex yet simple.

Elegga is often depicted as a young man or boy with a cane and a mischievous smirk