Photo
(Art by Victor P Corbella)
Eloko (plural: Bikolo)
Origins-Mongo tribe (Congo) Zaire
Habitat- Rainforest
Dwarf/trolls
Eloko (pl, Biloko) is a term in a Mongo-Nkundo language referring to a kind of dwarf-like creature that lives in the forests. They are believed to be the spirits of ancestors of the people living there. Legend has it that they haunt the forest because they have some grudge to settle with the living and are generally quite vicious. Biloko live in the densest and darkest part of the rain forest in central Zaire, jealously and ferociously guarding their treasures: the game and the rare fruits of the forest. Only intrepid hunters are said to enter the deepest forest and survive, because in order to be successful, hunters have to possess strong magic, without which they would never see any game at all. There are many tales about wives who insist upon joining their husbands in the forest only to faint as soon as they see their first Eloko. The Biloko live in hollow trees and are dressed only in leaves. They have no hair; only grass grows on their bodies; they have piercing eyes, snouts with mouths that can be opened wide enough to admit a human body, alive or dead, and long, sharp claws of which they rub their large potbellies to cast their evil magic. They possess little bells, which, in Central Africa are believed to be able to cast a spell on passers-by. Possessing an amulet, talisman or some type of charm can offer protection from this type of magic.
A typical Eloko tale:

One day a hunter took his wife, at her insistence, into the forest, where he had a hut with a palisade around it. When he went out to inspect his traps, he told her: “When you hear a bell, do not move. If you do, you will die!” Soon after he had left, she heard the charming sound of a little bell coming closer, for the Eloko has a good nose for feminine flesh. Finally, a gentle voice asked to be let in to his room. It was like the voice of a child. The woman opened the door and there was an Eloko, smelling like the forest, looking small and innocent. She offered him banana mash with fried fish but he refused: “We eat only human meat. I have not eaten for a long time. Give me a piece of your arm.” At last the woman consented, totally under the spell of the Eloko. That night, the husband found her bones.

(Art by Victor P Corbella)

Eloko (plural: Bikolo)

Origins-Mongo tribe (Congo) Zaire

Habitat- Rainforest

Dwarf/trolls

Eloko (pl, Biloko) is a term in a Mongo-Nkundo language referring to a kind of dwarf-like creature that lives in the forests. They are believed to be the spirits of ancestors of the people living there. Legend has it that they haunt the forest because they have some grudge to settle with the living and are generally quite vicious. Biloko live in the densest and darkest part of the rain forest in central Zaire, jealously and ferociously guarding their treasures: the game and the rare fruits of the forest. Only intrepid hunters are said to enter the deepest forest and survive, because in order to be successful, hunters have to possess strong magic, without which they would never see any game at all. There are many tales about wives who insist upon joining their husbands in the forest only to faint as soon as they see their first Eloko. The Biloko live in hollow trees and are dressed only in leaves. They have no hair; only grass grows on their bodies; they have piercing eyes, snouts with mouths that can be opened wide enough to admit a human body, alive or dead, and long, sharp claws of which they rub their large potbellies to cast their evil magic. They possess little bells, which, in Central Africa are believed to be able to cast a spell on passers-by. Possessing an amulet, talisman or some type of charm can offer protection from this type of magic.

A typical Eloko tale:

One day a hunter took his wife, at her insistence, into the forest, where he had a hut with a palisade around it. When he went out to inspect his traps, he told her: “When you hear a bell, do not move. If you do, you will die!” Soon after he had left, she heard the charming sound of a little bell coming closer, for the Eloko has a good nose for feminine flesh. Finally, a gentle voice asked to be let in to his room. It was like the voice of a child. The woman opened the door and there was an Eloko, smelling like the forest, looking small and innocent. She offered him banana mash with fried fish but he refused: “We eat only human meat. I have not eaten for a long time. Give me a piece of your arm.” At last the woman consented, totally under the spell of the Eloko. That night, the husband found her bones.

Photo
The Great Crab Dragonby ~VegasMike
No Folktale here, I found this on Deviantart and thought it was too hard not to post here. Reminds me of something out of Digimon.

The Great Crab Dragonby ~VegasMike

No Folktale here, I found this on Deviantart and thought it was too hard not to post here. Reminds me of something out of Digimon.

Photo
(Art by bloodhound-omega)
Legend of Isa Bere and King Samba
Dragon
Origins- Guinea
Isa Bere was a big dragon that lived in the mountains of Futa Jallon (Fouta Djallon). The dragon had a very large stomach and would drink from lakes and rivers. The dragon saw the river Niger and wanted quench its never ending thirst causing a drought in West Africa.
The young King Samba fearing for his people’s lived went to fight Isa Bere along with his bard Tarafe. The battle was long and painfully lasting 8 years, it is said that King Samba used over 800 Eventually the dragon was killed by a blow to the heart with a long sword forged by the youngest son of a Blacksmith in the kingdom, thus releasing the waters of the Niger.

(Art by Audore)

(Art by bloodhound-omega)

Legend of Isa Bere and King Samba

Dragon

Origins- Guinea

Isa Bere was a big dragon that lived in the mountains of Futa Jallon (Fouta Djallon). The dragon had a very large stomach and would drink from lakes and rivers. The dragon saw the river Niger and wanted quench its never ending thirst causing a drought in West Africa.

The young King Samba fearing for his people’s lived went to fight Isa Bere along with his bard Tarafe. The battle was long and painfully lasting 8 years, it is said that King Samba used over 800 Eventually the dragon was killed by a blow to the heart with a long sword forged by the youngest son of a Blacksmith in the kingdom, thus releasing the waters of the Niger.

(Art by Audore)

Photo
(Art by Kenya Marshall)
Asanbosam or Sasanbosam
Vampiric/Troll
Origins -Ashanti (Ghana, Cote d’Ivorie, Togo)
Forrest Dweller
A vampiric creature that hides in the tree waiting for it’s prey to walk below so it can strike by hanging off the branches with it’s iron hook feet and biting its victim with sharp iron teeth.
The descirption of this creature is differs depending on where you are. The Asanbosam is desibes as a hairy beast with red eyes or a slim with crooked eyes and can pass as a human in the dark or that it has a long snake tail that it uses to distract its prey. However the iron hook feet and sharp iron teeth are always mentioned.
In Ghana, if a person mentions its name they are destined to bring bad luck to themselves and everyone around them!

(Art by Kenya Marshall)

Asanbosam or Sasanbosam

Vampiric/Troll

Origins -Ashanti (Ghana, Cote d’Ivorie, Togo)

Forrest Dweller

A vampiric creature that hides in the tree waiting for it’s prey to walk below so it can strike by hanging off the branches with it’s iron hook feet and biting its victim with sharp iron teeth.

The descirption of this creature is differs depending on where you are. The Asanbosam is desibes as a hairy beast with red eyes or a slim with crooked eyes and can pass as a human in the dark or that it has a long snake tail that it uses to distract its prey. However the iron hook feet and sharp iron teeth are always mentioned.

In Ghana, if a person mentions its name they are destined to bring bad luck to themselves and everyone around them!


Photo
(Art by Rhasodii-kun)
Aigamucha or Aigamuxa
Ogre
Habitat- Sand Dunes
Origins- Khosian, Khoikhoi (South Africa)
Large man eating ogres with a mostly human like appearance that live in the dunes desserts. They have fangs of a bear and big hands and feet. They also have large eyes but not on their faces on their feet instead.

Like with most ogres they are slow and can be easily fooled, especially when chasing its prey as it needs to stand on its hand and lift at least one foot in the air to see.

(Art by Rhasodii-kun)

Aigamucha or Aigamuxa

Ogre

Habitat- Sand Dunes

Origins- Khosian, Khoikhoi (South Africa)

Large man eating ogres with a mostly human like appearance that live in the dunes desserts. They have fangs of a bear and big hands and feet. They also have large eyes but not on their faces on their feet instead.

Aigamuxa, Aigamuxa watching, feet

Like with most ogres they are slow and can be easily fooled, especially when chasing its prey as it needs to stand on its hand and lift at least one foot in the air to see.

Photo
Art by Jasing Dreams
Jengu (Meingu is the plural)
Mermaid/Water spirit/Deity
Rivers, Seas, Ocean, Lakes
Origins - Sawa, Duala, Bakeweri (Cameroon)
Very similar to Mami Wata figure although the belief of meingu may predate Mami Wata traditions. 
They are often depicted as very beautiful people with large eyes, wooly/kinky hair and gap toothed smiles. Although appearances of meingu can often differ from person to person. A jengu can often look more human or more fish-like
The meingu live in rivers and seas and are said to bring good fortune to those who worship the,. They can cute diseases and act as medim between the the worshipers and the spirit world

Art by Jasing Dreams

Jengu (Meingu is the plural)

Mermaid/Water spirit/Deity

Rivers, Seas, Ocean, Lakes

Origins - Sawa, Duala, Bakeweri (Cameroon)

Very similar to Mami Wata figure although the belief of meingu may predate Mami Wata traditions. 

They are often depicted as very beautiful people with large eyes, wooly/kinky hair and gap toothed smiles. Although appearances of meingu can often differ from person to person. A jengu can often look more human or more fish-like

The meingu live in rivers and seas and are said to bring good fortune to those who worship the,. They can cute diseases and act as medim between the the worshipers and the spirit world

Photo
The Legend of the African Grey Parrot
Origins - West and Central AfricaAccording to a legend from the ancestral culture of the Yoruba people of South Western Nigeria, the Republic of Benin, the Republic of Togo and Ghana, the African grey parrot which is known as Odide was not always grey, nor did it always have red tail feathers.God decided to have a contest to see which bird had the most beautiful feathers so all the birds in the world began preparing themselves. They sought to improve their beauty by adding things to themselves or trying to enhance their colors.At that time the Odide, which was white in color, made no preparations at all. This caused the other birds to wonder, why were they working so hard and why Odide was doing nothing at all. All of the other birds began to worry. They were afraid that if Odide entered the contest they would all lose.So, all the other birds got together and decided to spoil Odide’s natural beauty. They first tried to spoil Odide’s beauty by dumping ashes on it as it flew through the trees.This did not seem to have any effect.Next the other birds went to the Sorcerer to get an evil charm which would turn the Odide’s tail feathers red. The other birds were quite sure that the Odide would not enter the contest now, since they had spoiled its natural beauty.On the day of the beauty contest the Odide entered any way in spite of all that had been done to it. Much to the surprise of the other birds, God awarded the prize to the Odide because it came to the contest even though so much harm had been done to it.God said that the Odide was indeed the most beautiful bird, because true beauty is on the inside.
When Kings and Queens are crowned and members of the priesthood ordained at least one tail feather from the African grey must either be in the crown or some where on the person being crowned or ordained. This is done to remind them that true beauty comes from within.

The Legend of the African Grey Parrot

Origins - West and Central Africa

According to a legend from the ancestral culture of the Yoruba people of South Western Nigeria, the Republic of Benin, the Republic of Togo and Ghana, the African grey parrot which is known as Odide was not always grey, nor did it always have red tail feathers.
[image]
God decided to have a contest to see which bird had the most beautiful feathers so all the birds in the world began preparing themselves. They sought to improve their beauty by adding things to themselves or trying to enhance their colors.
At that time the Odide, which was white in color, made no preparations at all. This caused the other birds to wonder, why were they working so hard and why Odide was doing nothing at all. All of the other birds began to worry. They were afraid that if Odide entered the contest they would all lose.
So, all the other birds got together and decided to spoil Odide’s natural beauty. They first tried to spoil Odide’s beauty by dumping ashes on it as it flew through the trees.
This did not seem to have any effect.
Next the other birds went to the Sorcerer to get an evil charm which would turn the Odide’s tail feathers red. The other birds were quite sure that the Odide would not enter the contest now, since they had spoiled its natural beauty.

On the day of the beauty contest the Odide entered any way in spite of all that had been done to it. Much to the surprise of the other birds, God awarded the prize to the Odide because it came to the contest even though so much harm had been done to it.
God said that the Odide was indeed the most beautiful bird, because true beauty is on the inside.


When Kings and Queens are crowned and members of the priesthood ordained at least one tail feather from the African grey must either be in the crown or some where on the person being crowned or ordained. This is done to remind them that true beauty comes from within.

Photo
(Artwork by Steve Prescott)
Yehwe Zogbanu
Origins- Dahomey Fon (Benin)
Deadly
A giant troll covered with 30 horns on his head and body and a deadly threat to hunters or anyone as it is extremely territorial and will kill and eat anyone trespassing.

(Artwork by Steve Prescott)

Yehwe Zogbanu

Origins- Dahomey Fon (Benin)

Deadly

A giant troll covered with 30 horns on his head and body and a deadly threat to hunters or anyone as it is extremely territorial and will kill and eat anyone trespassing.

Photo

(Artwork by xsunnybirdx)
Yumboes
Fairies/nymphs
Forest people
Origins- Wolof tribe on Goree Island. (Senegal)
The Yumboes are fairies that livebeneath the Paps hills, they come out at night to dance under the moonlight. They feast on large table served by partially invisible servants, only the hands and feet of these servant can be seen.

Yumboes are described as two feet tall translucent skin, white/silver hair, they eat the food that they steal from humans but also catch their own food themselves. Another name for them is Bakhna Rakna meaning good people as they are extremley friendly and often invite natives and foreigners to their feasts.

(Artwork by xsunnybirdx)

Yumboes

Fairies/nymphs

Forest people

Origins- Wolof tribe on Goree Island. (Senegal)

The Yumboes are fairies that livebeneath the Paps hills, they come out at night to dance under the moonlight. They feast on large table served by partially invisible servants, only the hands and feet of these servant can be seen.

Yumboes are described as two feet tall translucent skin, white/silver hair, they eat the food that they steal from humans but also catch their own food themselves. Another name for them is Bakhna Rakna meaning good people as they are extremley friendly and often invite natives and foreigners to their feasts.

Photo
Ouagadou-Bida
Deadly
Flying/Serpent Dragon
Origins- Kingdom of Ghana

 
The tale of Ouagadou-Bida is said to be the tale of the fall of the Kingdom of Ghana.
In the capital city of the Kingdom of Ghana there was a sacred grove. A serpent spirit lived in a cave within the grove. This was Ougadou-Bida, protector of the tribes of the Ghana kings. Through the protection of the kings, the whole kingdom was protected.
Every year, a girl would be sacrificed to the serpent. One year a girl called Sia was selected. Her fiance Amadou Sefedokote decided to stop this by killing the serpent-spirit. Hiding behind a tree, he waited for the serpent to come out of its cave.
He attempted to kill the serpent by chopping off its head, but the head simply regrew. Amadou did not give up, and kept chopping off the serpent’s head only for it to regrow. After seven times, the serpent finally died. Amadou and Sia escaped the city.
Without the spirit to protect Ghana, a drought fell across the Kingdom killing crops and animals. It is said that the people of Ghana became nomads, and Ghana was no more.
This name can be spelt in several ways, including Ougadou-Bida and Wagadoo-Bida.

Ouagadou-Bida

Deadly

Flying/Serpent Dragon

Origins- Kingdom of Ghana

The tale of Ouagadou-Bida is said to be the tale of the fall of the Kingdom of Ghana.

In the capital city of the Kingdom of Ghana there was a sacred grove. A serpent spirit lived in a cave within the grove. This was Ougadou-Bida, protector of the tribes of the Ghana kings. Through the protection of the kings, the whole kingdom was protected.

Every year, a girl would be sacrificed to the serpent. One year a girl called Sia was selected. Her fiance Amadou Sefedokote decided to stop this by killing the serpent-spirit. Hiding behind a tree, he waited for the serpent to come out of its cave.

He attempted to kill the serpent by chopping off its head, but the head simply regrew. Amadou did not give up, and kept chopping off the serpent’s head only for it to regrow. After seven times, the serpent finally died. Amadou and Sia escaped the city.

Without the spirit to protect Ghana, a drought fell across the Kingdom killing crops and animals. It is said that the people of Ghana became nomads, and Ghana was no more.

This name can be spelt in several ways, including Ougadou-Bida and Wagadoo-Bida.