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"There was a young girl named Imola who was preparing to marry her beloved boyfriend. According to custom, before a girl could be married, a pot of walnuts would be cooked overnight and shared with the relatives of the would-be groom. If the walnuts were bad, unhappiness would plague the marriage. The jealous second wife of Imola’s father burned the walnuts in secret overnight; when Imola discovered this, she climbed up toward the heavens in search of good walnuts and became the moon. Her suitor then followed her up into the sky and became the North Star."

— Imola & the Moon (Celestial Folklore)

(Source: thefemaletyrant)

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King Sango was acquainted with many deadly charms and he once happened to discover a preparation by which he could attract lightning.

He foolishly decided to try the effect of the charm first of all on his own palace, which was at the foot of a hill.

Ascending the hill with his courtiers, the King employed the charm: a storm suddenly rose, the palace was struck by lightning and burnt to the ground, together with Sango’s whole family.

Overcome with grief at having lost his possessions, and above all his sons, the impetuous King resolved to retire to a corner of his kingdom and rule no more. Some of his courtiers agreed with him, and others tried to dissuade him from the plan; but Sango in his rage executed a hundred and sixty of them —eighty who had disagreed with him, and eighty who had agree too eagerly!

Then, accompanied by a few friends, he left the palace and started on his long journey. One by one his friends deserted him on the way, until he was left alone, and in despair he decided to put an end to his life, which he rashly did.

When they heard of the deed, his people came to the spot and gave him an honourable funeral, and he was ever afterwards worshipped as the god of thunder and lightning.

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Aja An Orisha and patron of the forest, the animals and herbal healers of whome she taught their art.
Aja is referred to as “wild wind” in Yoruba. It is said that if someone is carried away by Aja and returns they are believed to have become a powerful “jujuman” or babalawo. The journey supposedly will have a duratation of between 7 days to 3 months, and the person carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven.

Aja An Orisha and patron of the forest, the animals and herbal healers of whome she taught their art.

Aja is referred to as “wild wind” in Yoruba. It is said that if someone is carried away by Aja and returns they are believed to have become a powerful “jujuman” or babalawo. The journey supposedly will have a duratation of between 7 days to 3 months, and the person carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven.

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Orunmila (also known as Orula, Orunla, or Ifa) 
The orisha of divination. He is the “eleripin” — the witness of destiny — who knows everything that awaits us as part of our fate. He has a very close working relationship with Eleggua and together they intercede on behalf of humanity to alter people’s destinies, ward off death and other misfortunes, and guide us to cultivate good character. His worship is primarily centred around the Ifá tradition, both in traditional African worship and in the African Diaspora in the new world, where his initiated priests, called awos, babalawos, iyanifas or oluwos, act as diviners for the greater community. He is petitioned for help with making wise descisons, opening roads, healing and protection from evil.

Orunmila (also known as Orula, Orunla, or Ifa)

The orisha of divination. He is the “eleripin” — the witness of destiny — who knows everything that awaits us as part of our fate. He has a very close working relationship with Eleggua and together they intercede on behalf of humanity to alter people’s destinies, ward off death and other misfortunes, and guide us to cultivate good character. His worship is primarily centred around the Ifá tradition, both in traditional African worship and in the African Diaspora in the new world, where his initiated priests, called awos, babalawos, iyanifas or oluwos, act as diviners for the greater community. He is petitioned for help with making wise descisons, opening roads, healing and protection from evil.


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Oshun (Ohun, or Ochun) 
The Orisha of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy and sweet fresh waters of rivers.  Ọṣhun is beneficent, generous and very kind. She does, however, have a horrific temper, one which she seldom ever loses but which causes untold destruction whenever she does
She is often depicted as a mermaid that resides in the river Oshun in modern Nigeria in the Osun state. During her yearly festival she is said to choose one or more young women to represent her in the dance of the sister of the waters.

Oshun (Ohun, or Ochun)

The Orisha of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy and sweet fresh waters of rivers.  Ọṣhun is beneficent, generous and very kind. She does, however, have a horrific temper, one which she seldom ever loses but which causes untold destruction whenever she does

She is often depicted as a mermaid that resides in the river Oshun in modern Nigeria in the Osun state. During her yearly festival she is said to choose one or more young women to represent her in the dance of the sister of the waters.

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Oya (also known as Yansa or Yansan)
a powerful female warrior orisha, one of Shango’s wives, owner of the marketplace, and owner of the cemetery and the ruler of winds. She, along with Orunmila, are the only two orishas who defeated Ikú, the force of death. She stole Shango’s secret of fire and now throws lightning bolts just like him. She raises the dead and commands them as her armies. She carries a machete and screams as she rides into battle on the tornado.

Oya (also known as Yansa or Yansan)

a powerful female warrior orisha, one of Shango’s wives, owner of the marketplace, and owner of the cemetery and the ruler of winds. She, along with Orunmila, are the only two orishas who defeated Ikú, the force of death. She stole Shango’s secret of fire and now throws lightning bolts just like him. She raises the dead and commands them as her armies. She carries a machete and screams as she rides into battle on the tornado.

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Ogun (also known Oggun, Ogum, or Ogou) 
A warrior orisha, along with Eleggua and Ochosi. He is a talented blacksmith, a crafter of tools, and the father of technology. He is the cutting edge of the knife that can be used either to heal or hurt. Without Ogun, neither the orishas nor humanity could eat nor would we all cease to exist. He is a fierce soldier who is known for his fiery temper and his unending loyalty. He is, in many ways, the executor of Olodumare’s justice on the earth. In fact, it is still Yoruban custom to swear an oath upon a piece of iron when testifying, instead of a holy book, as Ogun’s retribution for breaking that oath is something truly to be feared. He is petitioned for help with seeking employment, defense against enemies, or for protection.

Ogun (also known Oggun, Ogum, or Ogou)

A warrior orisha, along with Eleggua and Ochosi. He is a talented blacksmith, a crafter of tools, and the father of technology. He is the cutting edge of the knife that can be used either to heal or hurt. Without Ogun, neither the orishas nor humanity could eat nor would we all cease to exist. He is a fierce soldier who is known for his fiery temper and his unending loyalty. He is, in many ways, the executor of Olodumare’s justice on the earth. In fact, it is still Yoruban custom to swear an oath upon a piece of iron when testifying, instead of a holy book, as Ogun’s retribution for breaking that oath is something truly to be feared. He is petitioned for help with seeking employment, defense against enemies, or for protection.

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Eleggua (also known as Elegba, Legba, Elewa, or Eshu)
Is the most important of the Yoruba Orisha pantheon. He is the owener of the crossroads and his spirits is behind every door and a pathway. Without Eleggua the universal power cannot flow in this world that is why is his always propitiated first in every ceremony. He is also a trickster God, constanly challenging humanity’s intergity at every turn, his very complex yet simple.
Elegga is often depicted as a young man or boy with a cane and a mischievous smirk

Eleggua (also known as Elegba, Legba, Elewa, or Eshu)

Is the most important of the Yoruba Orisha pantheon. He is the owener of the crossroads and his spirits is behind every door and a pathway. Without Eleggua the universal power cannot flow in this world that is why is his always propitiated first in every ceremony. He is also a trickster God, constanly challenging humanity’s intergity at every turn, his very complex yet simple.

Elegga is often depicted as a young man or boy with a cane and a mischievous smirk

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Oshunmare, Oxumare, Oshunmaire, Aida Hwedo 
Origins -Yoruba/Dahomey
Celesitial
Friendly
Reptilian/Dragon
Oshunmare is a giant rainbow serpent that is of both sexes and represents procreation and is said to be the link the the world of the mudane to the world of the ancestors and is part of the wider Orisha pantheon. Zhe is known to live in deep waters and sleep in the mud in dry seasons, zhe also flies through sky as a beautiful rainbow bringing down droplets of water to replenish crops.

Oshunmare, Oxumare, Oshunmaire, Aida Hwedo 

Origins -Yoruba/Dahomey

Celesitial

Friendly

Reptilian/Dragon

Oshunmare is a giant rainbow serpent that is of both sexes and represents procreation and is said to be the link the the world of the mudane to the world of the ancestors and is part of the wider Orisha pantheon. Zhe is known to live in deep waters and sleep in the mud in dry seasons, zhe also flies through sky as a beautiful rainbow bringing down droplets of water to replenish crops.